“This is the first exhibition and book to explore the story of the American photographic road trip — one of the most distinct, important, and appealing themes of the medium,”

“The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip” drives into the Detroit Institute of Arts to explore the story of the American photographic road trip from June 17 to September 11.

According to the DIA press release, the photographs and images in the exhibit document the evolution of American car culture, the idea of the open road and how photographers embraced America.

“This is the first exhibition and book to explore the story of the American photographic road trip — one of the most distinct, important, and appealing themes of the medium,” according to the press release. “Presented in chronological order, the featured artists and road trips represent the evolution of American car culture, the idea of the open road, and how photographers embraced the subject of America in order reflect on place, time, and self.”

DIA curator Nancy Barr said the exhibition will show the work of 19 photographers with over 70 photographs on view. The exhibition also includes the works of Justine Kurland, who will speak at the DIA on June 16 at 7:30 p.m.

 

“Justine traveled with her young son capturing the people and places she encountered on the road over the last few years,” said Barr.

Barr said her colleague Denise Wolff, an editor and curator at Aperture in New York City, sent her the “The Open Road” proposal.

“Aperture has a long history of publishing photography books and organizing exhibitions that have advanced the public’s knowledge and understanding of many important photographers and moments in the medium’s history,” she said. “I thought it was important to bring the exhibition here since it will be the first time Detroit audiences will have an opportunity to see the work of so many important photographers, as well as see some of the iconic images they have made during their careers.”

 

 "New Mexico," Bernard Plossu (Eaton Fine Art, West Palm Beach, FLA.)


 

Barr said audiences can expect to see photographs from 1955 to the present, both black-and-white and color photographs and some very large scale.

“The subject matter includes things that you would expect to see on a road trip through America — open horizons, roadside attractions, tourists, everyday people, but some surprises as well, like the photographs of Swiss artists Nico Krebs or Taiyo Onorato’s from their series ‘The Great Unreal,’” said Barr. “The collaborators create otherworldly and even absurd scenes from the American roadside by altering their photographs without the help of digitization.”

Sophomore Jasmine Dominguez said she would love to see new and different places from the exhibit at the DIA.

“It’s interesting to see how things evolved over time,” Dominguez said. “Photos are so important and can show the moments that we forget about. I can’t wait to see all the history (at the DIA).”

Senior Noah Tylenda said he likes the idea of the DIA’s exhibit, because it reminds him of sight seeing.

“I want to travel someday and take my own pictures,” he said. “[The exhibit] could give me some inspiration.”

The DIA will host other exhibitions including the “Guest of Honor”, featuring a very famous painting “The Gallery of the Louvre” by Samuel B. Morse.

For more information about all of the exhibitions and programs at the DIA, visit dia.org

“Wayne State students, as well as residents of Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties are admitted free to the DIA and there is no additional charge for The Open Road (exhibit), so there are no excuses to miss it.”

Contact News Editor Jordan Works: jordanworks@yahoo.com. Follow her on Twitter: @jordan_works.

  
 "Outside Memphis, Tennessee," Inge Morath, 1960.   

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.